The LISZT UNIVERSITY's buildings

Fürstenhaus - Main building

Address
Platz der Demokratie 2/3
99423 Weimar

Opening hours
Monday to Friday  7.00am – 10.00pm
Saturday  8.00am – 10.00pm
Sunday  9.00am – 10.00pm

In the Fürstenhaus, you will find the following offices and rooms
President's office: first floor, room 114 (secretariat, offices of the president and the vice-presidents)
Library | Mediothek: ground floor
Reception and post boxes: ground floor
Orchestra office: ground floor, room 024
Concert bookings and concert hall reservations: ground floor, room 024
Faculty I, Dean's office: ground floor, room 020
Concert hall: first floor, room 103
Recording studio: second floor, room 211
Studio for electroacoustic music, third floor, room 326

Teaching rooms for the following departments
Department of String Instruments and Harp
Department of Early Music
Department of Keyboard Instruments
Department of Contemporary Music


History of the Fürstenhaus
The main building at the University of Music  FRANZ LISZT Weimar, located on the Platz der Demokratie, has an especially interesting history. As a representative building for the estates of the country, building began in 1770. After the devastating fire of 1774 in the castle located opposite the building, the Fürstenhaus served as a residence for the ducal family – this is where the name Fürstenhaus comes from ('Fürst' can be translated into English as ruler or prince). After this it served various governmental purposes. From 1808 to 1816 it served as a domicile for the 'Free Drawing School'. From 1848 to 1920, the Fürstenhaus was the house of parliament for the grand duchy Saxony-Weimar-Eisenach. From 1920 to 1933 it was the house of parliament of Thuringia. From 1933-1945, the NSDAP-Gauleitung, the governor of Thuringia in the Third Reich, and high-level SS and police administration resided in the building.

The government and parliament of Thuringia, including the Ministry of the Interior, which had also been located in the Fürstenhaus, have worked since 1950 in the new capital of Thuringia, Erfurt. The administration of the University of Music  FRANZ LISZT Weimar managed to acquire the building in 1951. A thorough renovation of the building, which was in relatively bad shape, could not be undertaken. With great effort, the building was furnished and the most critical building modifications were able to be made. The building lying directly to the north-west of the school was also transferred to the LISZT UNIVERSITY.

The urgently needed restoration of the building took place from 1992 to 1999; this took place while the school was in session except for the last two years. A significant part of the building was replaced; in 1997, the entire middle section of the building was taken out to rebuild the festival room, which was actually originally conceived in 1770, but never realised. Since 1999 the festival room has been the core that characterises the educational and artistic centre of the school. A modern sound studio and a studio for electroacoustic music are also located in the Fürstenhaus. On the ground floor one can find the school's library as well as the media library. String players, pianists and composers have their main place of study in this building, and from here the rectorate manages the school.

Rößlersches Haus - Administration building

Address
Platz der Demokratie 2/3
99423 Weimar

Opening hours
Monday to Friday  6.30am – 5.00pm


You will find the following offices in the administration building
Chancellor's office: third floor, rooms 304 and 305
Events office: ground floor, rooms 001 and 002
IT: ground floor, rooms 003 and 005
Academic and student affairs: first and second floors, rooms 104, 105, 106, and 209
Human resources: first and third floors, rooms 101, 102, 103, and 301
Marketing: second floor, rooms 204 and 205
Media and editorial office: second and third floors, rooms 206 and 307
Finances: second floor, rooms 201, 202, and 203
Controlling: third floor, room 303
Lawyer's office: third floor, room 302
Instrument loans: second floor, room 201
Print media office: third floor, room 307


History of the Rößlersches Haus
The administration building of the University of Music  FRANZ LISZT Weimar, located just to the north-west of the main building 'Fürstenhaus' embodies a contradiction in that the building has a massive facade whereas the building itself is actually quite narrow. This fact can only be attributed to its somewhat complicated historical development (as well as to state protection of historical monuments). Originally there were three buildings there – the 'Fürstenkeller' facing the market to the north, a building to the rear and a small connecting wooden building used as a stall. After the fire of 1774 in the castle, when the ducal family moved into the Fürstenhaus, the square which was gradually developing in front of the Fürstenhaus needed a defining border to the west – to the east there was the Grünes Schloss (which houses the library today). Instead of creating a new building from scratch, it was decided in 1785 to build a so-called curtain facade onto the exterior of the buildings which were already there. Behind the facade the buildings grew together over centuries while serving various uses. After colonnades were built onto the Fürstenhaus in 1889, the Rößlersches Haus needed a contemporary substantiation; this was realised in 1891 and 1892. The large balcony in the centre was removed in the middle of the 20th century.

From 1909 to 1936 the building was owned by the Rößler family, it was then bought by the government for use by the police and turned into an administration building. In 1951 it was given to the LISZT UNIVERSITY along with the Fürstenhaus and began serving as the administration building. During restoration lasting all the way up until 1999, the process of making it one building had to be completed. Today a modern administration building is situated behind the curtain facade.

Klostergebäude Am Palais

Address
Am Palais 4
99423 Weimar

Opening hours
Monday to Friday  7.00am – 10.00pm
Saturday  8.00am – 10.00pm (access with chip card)
Sunday  9.00am – 10.00 pm (access with chip card)


You will find the following offices and rooms at the Klostergebäude Am Palais

Secretariat for the Department of Music Education and Church Music: first floor, room 107
Concert Hall Am Palais: first floor, room 109
::: Disposition of the organ at the Saal Am Palais (PDF) :::
Teaching rooms of the Department of Music Education and Church Music: first and second floors


History of the Klostergebäude Am Palais
'Am Palais' is the name of the street where the monastery building Am Palais of the University of Music  FRANZ LISZT Weimar is located. The street leads to the 'Wittumspalais', the former residence of the widow duchess Anna Amalia (1739–1807). Anna Amalia had an important role in establishing the fame of Weimar as a cultural centre. One reason for this was the fact that she and her son, the duke Herzog Carl August, had brought some of the greatest classical poets to their 'company at table' in the Wittumspalais. Two attic rooms in the side tract of this palace were the first place of residence for the 'Großherzogliche Orchesterschule' (Grand Ducal Orchestral School) founded in 1872, now part of the LISZT University.

In 1874 the school moved to the neighbouring 'Kornhaus', which used to be a Franciscan monastery around the year 1500; Martin Luther preached there several times. After the monks were expelled as a result of the reformation around 1530, the church there was used as a repository for grain – this is where the name comes from; 'Korn' can be translated as grain.

From 1874 the grand ducal school and starting in 1919 the state music school expanded continually until 1925 at which point they had the Kornhaus all to themselves. In 1929 primary school music teachers were educated there. In 1930 the 'Staatliche Musikschule' became the 'Hochschule für Musik' and in the beginning of 1933 the Department of Church Music was founded at the Kornhaus as well. Up until the year 1951 it was the main building for the University of Music  FRANZ LISZT Weimar – at that time known simply as the Hochschule für Musik.

Even to this day the departments of church music and school music education work there; these departments have use of the entire building. The hall located in the building contains a massive organ, which is indispensable for the education of the organists of the LISZT University. Since its restoration in the years 1991 to 1998, the building is safe from collapse and outfitted with modern classrooms. The gabled roof, which was bombed in 1945, has pointed proudly to the sky over Weimar since its renovation in 1997 and 1998.

hochschulzentrum am horn

Address
Carl-Alexander-Platz 1/ Leibnizallee
99425 Weimar

Opening hours
Monday to Friday  8.00am – 6.00pm (no restrictions)
Monday to Sunday  7.00am – 10.00pm (access with chip card)


You will find the following offices and rooms at the hochschulzentrum am horn
Archive of the LISZT UNIVERSITY | Thuringian state music archive: basement
Faculty II, Dean's office: ground floor, room 024
Faculty III, Dean's office: ground floor, room 001
Secretariat for the Department of Musicology Weimar-Jena: fourth floor, room 403
Musicology library: fourth floor, room 409
Office of the Arts management department: fourth floor, room 408
Music theory offices: second floor, rooms 205–207

Teaching rooms for the following departments
Department of Wind / Brass Instruments and Percussion
Department of Conducting and Repetiteurship
Department of Jazz
Department of Musicology Weimar-Jena, with Department of Arts Management


History of the hochschulzentrum am horn
Carl Heinrich Ferdinand Streichhan, the leading building director in Weimar in the mid 19th century, erected a casern on the hill east of the Ilm from 1854 to 1859 in historical style; the building has a high artistic and architectural value and was later renamed the Weimar Acropolis because of its location towering above the city. The last soldiers – after 1945 Soviet and Russian – moved out of this building in 1993. After several years of renovation supported in part by the European Union, many departments of the school have been using the building with its modernly outfitted and sound-proof rooms since 2001. The name 'School Centre' is an indicator that it is the largest building of the LISZT UNIVERSITY.

Wind players, percussionists, conductors, jazz musicians, musicologists and culture management students have their main place of education in this building. In addition, all lectures in music theory and musicology take place there. In the tower in the western wing one can find the departmental library for musicology. The University Archive / THURINGIAN REGIONAL MUSIC ARCHIVE is located on the ground floor. Opposite this building there are two student residence buildings, where students can feel at home.

Bach House Belvedere

Address
Schloss Belvedere
99425 Weimar

Opening hours
Monday to Friday  7.00am – 10.00pm
Saturday  8.00am – 6.00pm (access with chip card)
Sunday  8.00am – 6.00pm (acces with chip card)

You will find the following rooms at the Bach House
Teaching rooms for the Department of Guitar

Beethoven House Belvedere

Address
Schloss Belvedere
99425 Weimar

Opening hourse
Monday to Friday  7.00am – 10.00pm
Saturday  8.00am – 6.00pm (access with chip card)
Sunday  8.00am – 6.00pm (access with chip card)


You will find the following offices and rooms at the Beethoven House
Teaching rooms and hall of the Department of Voice | Opera: first and second floors
Secretariat for the Departments of Voice | Opera and Guitar: first floor, room 001

Haydn House Belvedere

Address
Schloss Belvedere
99425 Weimar

Opening hours
Monday to Friday  7.00am – 10.00pm
Saturday  8.00am – 6.00pm (access with chip card)
Sunday  8.00am – 6.00pm (access with chip card)

You will find the following rooms at the Haydn House
Teaching rooms of the Institute of Accordion (Department of Keyboard Instruments)

Studio Theatre Belvedere

Address
Schloss Belvedere (Wagner House)
99425 Weimar

Opening hours
Monday to Friday 7.00am – 10.00pm
Saturday  8.00am – 6.00pm (access with chip card)
Sunday  8.00am – 6.00pm (access with chip card)


The following activities take place at the Studio Theatre Belvedere
Rehearsals and performances of the opera school of the Department of Voice | Opera


History of the Studio Theatre
The Weimar opera school is one of few schools in Germany to have its own studio theatre. It lies within the idyllic parkland grounds of Belvedere just outside of town. It is situated next to Beethoven House, in which all vocal related subjects are taught. All drama/theatre lessons as well as all performances take place in the theatre so that from day one, the students can learn what the requirements and necessities of the stage are. Through the development of each individual’s presence, these lessons provide a feed back both for the students and teachers.

Beyond that, the studio theatre Belvedere with its specifically young and fresh aesthetics offers the possibility of rehearsing and presenting works of all genres with a small orchestra in front of an interested audience.

The auditorium has approximately 140 seats. There is room for a Mozart orchestra in the pit which can be lowered. It is possible to alter the auditorium layout through flexible platforms that can be hoisted thus providing differing communication possibilities. The 10 x 10 metre stage has a rotating platform and many features including modern lighting, sound and video techniques.

Altenburg

Address
Jenaer Str. 3
99425 Weimar


You will find the following offices and rooms at the Altenburg
Liszt-Salon: first floor
Exhibition 'Liszt, the Altenburg and Europe': first floor
Franz-Liszt-Centre
Chair for the History of Jewish Music: second floor
DFG research-group 'Melodisch-rhythmische Gestaltung von Jazzimprovisationen. Rechnerbasierte Musikanalyse einstimmiger Jazzsoli': ground floor


History of the Altenburg

The Altenburg is located in the Jenaer street which lies just outside of Weimar's city centre beyond the Ilm park. It was built in 1810–1811 and during the years following 1848, Princess Carolyne of Sayn Wittgenstein and her husband, Franz Liszt, lived there. The energetic artistic and cultural/political commitment of the celebrated musician, as well as the social radiance of his noble friends soon made the Altenburg a centre for the intellectual exchange of ideas of artists and those interested in culture from both Germany and foreign countries.

After an eventful history the Altenburg is once again enjoying a prominent position in cultural circles. Since 1989, through the University of Music FRANZ LISZT Weimar ( the former orchestral school founded by Franz Liszt) along with the Franz Liszt Society e.V., the building has become a central location for research regarding Liszt as well as a meeting place for artists from all world.

Tour of the LISZT University